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What is the best summary of the first paragraph of “how we entered world war 1”

The best summary of the first paragraph of “how we entered world war 1” is that in 1914, Archduke Ferdinand was assassinated by Serbian nationalists. 

This event caused Austria-Hungary to declare war on Serbia and subsequently trigger what would be the beginning of World War One. 

The First World War lasted for four years before ending in 1918 with the Treaty of Versailles.

This summary is meant to briefly explain the main topic within this article which discusses how Europe went from peace to conflict in WWI. 

Another point made within this sentence is that other nations or countries also helped trigger this event or started WWI such as Russia and Germany who were fighting over control over Poland 1 .

Also a point made in the article is that European nations wanted this war because of great losses in WWI. 

The English and French were less affected by this war because they did not have many soldiers sent to the front line. 

These nations also had less loans due to being occupied during WWI.

The last two paragraphs of this summary are very short and do not go into any further detail about the main topic within this article which explains how Europe went from peace to conflict in WWI. 

Here is the answer for, what is the best summary of the first paragraph of “how we entered world war 1”?

It’s a very timely moment that we have found ourselves in which being able to clearly describe the subject of a paragraph in a few key points is important.

Introduction: 

In the early 20th century, European powers were locked in competition for colonies and influence. In 1914, war broke out between these powers when Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary was killed by an assassin from Bosnia. The assassination sparked a spiraling series of events that led to what is now known as World War I with most world players pulled into battle regardless of their intentions.

The European powers involved in the First World War were no strangers to military competition. They had been fighting each other for land and influence since the 19th century. 

Post-Napoleonic Europe was a place of corsets, sabres and battleships. 

And, while battleships may have been filled with artillery and cavalry, they all still used sails to power their machines. For the seafaring nations that dominated this time period.

The Setting

At the time of World War I, almost all of Europe’s major powers were armed with either traditional cannons or the latest in long-range rifles. Meanwhile, most of the world was under colonial rule by European powers. 

A mere half century before, the Industrial Revolution had enabled Europe to outpace other nations economically, forcing them to become more interested in collecting colonies than producing goods. 

To most European powers though, this didn’t matter so much since most Europeans lived on the continent they felt most comfortable ruling. Britain was not one of these nations.

The United Kingdom rose to prominence in the 18th century when it became the first nation to “deploy” fully modern warships with ironclad hulls and steam propulsion at sea .

What happened in the First World War?

The First World War (often called WWI or The Great War), which began in 1914 and ended in 1918, was the first global war. It pitted all the great powers of Europe against each other, along with Russia, Japan, the United States, Brazil and many other countries. 

It began when an Austrian prince was assassinated by a Serbian nationalist. Austria-Hungary, fearing that Serbia would side with Russia in support of claims to Bosnia-Herzegovina (which it had annexed), declared war on Serbia. 

Germany then declared war on both Russia and France because Russia supported Austria-Hungary’s rival claims to Serbia.

What was the cause of the First World War?

There were many reasons for World War I: militarism, alliances, imperialism and nationalism. This guide will concentrate on three: militarism and the arms race, nationalism and alliances.

The military forces of all powers were larger than ever before. 

All European nations had conscription (with the exception of Switzerland) so their populations were trained in the use of weapons from childhood, not just in emergencies.

Such as war, but daily training for eventual combat service was considered a normal part of their lives.

  • When historians look back and compare pre-war and wartime technology, the difference is very obvious.  
  • The European powers involved in World War I were no strangers to military competition.  
  • Europe was a place of corsets, sabres and battleships .  
  • Battleships may have been filled with artillery and cavalry , but they all still used sails to power their machines. For the seafaring nations that dominated this time period, this meant that the world’s oceans had become their battlefields, too.
  • The global conquests of what used to be called “the Far East” by European powers forced them to find new ways for surfacing capital in far-away lands .